Viewpoint

When writing a fictional story the author needs to decide how the story is to be related to the reader. Will it be told from the viewpoint of a single character or multiple characters? It could even be told from no particular viewpoint, simply an impersonal relation of events. Most authors opt for at least one viewpoint character because that allows the feelings and thoughts of the character to be revealed to the reader. This one of the key advantages that writing has over visual media.

I chose a single viewpoint character for Audrey of Farmerton because I wanted to gradually unveil my fantasy world. That worked well, allowing the reader to learn more as Audrey did, and it also simplified a number of things. But for the sequel (tentatively titled The Witch’s City), I am switching to multiple viewpoints in order to better utilize the other characters that appeared in the first book. I am, however, only using a single viewpoint character in each scene. There is a style of writing known as third person omniscient in which the reader is privy to the thoughts of many characters at the same time, but I decided against trying to use it.

Writing from multiple viewpoints is proving to be a mixed blessing. It’s nice to be able to relate things that occur in locations apart from the main protagonist and which she may never learn about, but it also complicates matters and requires more planning. And when a scene contains multiple viewpoint characters, I now have to decide just whose viewpoint to use. I’m finding it challenging, but that’s just another part of trying to become a writer.

Another issue with multiple viewpoints is making them fit the character. Some characters basically say what they think, while others might frequently say one thing while thinking another. Personally, I find the later type to be the most fun to write. I like showing the actual thoughts, especially when they’re sarcastic or snarky. And how to properly show these thoughts will be a topic for a future blog post.

Chapters

When I first began to write Audrey of Farmerton, it was a single giant text document. It was divided into individual scenes, but not chapters. I hadn’t divided it up because I really wasn’t sure how to go about it.

Scenes in books aren’t much different than scenes in movies or TV shows. They mark a change of location, a change of viewpoint, or an abrupt passage of time. In a book, they are often delineated by a line containing one or more symbols, as shown below this paragraph. Some books simply place an extra blank line to mark the end of a scene, but that is a bad practice because blank lines are hard to spot at the top or bottom of a page.

*    *    *

The beginning of a chapter is the beginning of a scene, and its end the end of a scene, but a chapter can contain multiple scenes. It might, for example, flip between the viewpoints of two people as they speak. It is also worth noting that some authors only put one scene in each chapter.

A chapter is supposed to be somewhat self-contained, but that rule isn’t always adhered to. The lengths of the chapters in a book are also supposed to vary by no more than a factor of two, but that rule is also routinely ignored. It seems to be more a question of personal preference and style.

I began to divide my book into chapters, finding that it was sometimes easy, and sometimes a challenge. In several instances I ended up moving scenes around to create chapters with more of a theme. And sometimes I wrote additional scenes to flesh out short chapters. I ended up with forty-some chapters in the range of 2500 to 5000 words (or so).

Many books have only chapter numbers (and some have scene numbers within the chapter). I started with only numbers, but then began adding one-word names just to make it easier to navigate the book. My beta readers liked them, and so they ended up staying in. Now coming up with a chapter title is simply part of my writing process.

Self-Publishing on Amazon

Yesterday morning I uploaded Audrey of Farmerton to Amazon so that it could be published via Kindle Desktop Publishing (KDP). The uploading process was simple. Approval  was supposed to take up to 48 hours, but just a few hours later my book was live on Amazon here. Today I created an author page on Amazon and linked it to this blog.

Amazon will publish nearly anything as a Kindle ebook providing it meets their format and content guidelines. The formatting was straightforward because I was using software (Scrivener) that supports the Kindle format.

I opted for KDP Select as an additional option. This allows people with Kindle Unlimited subscriptions to read my book for free. Amazon Prime members can also borrow it for free. In exchange, I am guaranteeing Amazon exclusivity, which means I can’t sell copies myself or through any other retailer.

Strunk and White

There is one book that anyone seeking to write in English should read. It is The Elements of Style by William Strunk Jr. and E.B. White. It may be nearly a century old, but much of the advice it contains is still applicable today. And it has been revised several times over the years as the English language and technology have changed.

Strunk and White, as it is usually called, is packed full of valuable advice about punctuation, grammar, and writing style. If you are an author (or an aspiring author) you should definitely purchase a copy and read it cover-to-cover. And then read it again. It is the kind of book you can read multiple times and still manage to learn new things.

If you want more in-depth advice on punctuation and grammar, as well as information on formatting publications, then you may wish to purchase The Chicago Manual of Style. It is a much larger (and more expensive) book, and the formatting information it contains is probably of little interest to someone simply planning to publish an ebook. It is designed as a reference for authors, editors, and publishers.

Word Count

When I first began to write Audrey of Farmerton, I was concerned if I could even write enough for a novel. I did some research and discovered that the threshold is considered to be about 90,000 words. It’s not an absolute. There are famous novels much shorter, and many that are far longer. In addition, I discovered that fantasy and science fiction novels tend to be longer because they require a great deal of world-building.

In the end, my worries about word count were groundless. The first draft was just over 160,000 words. The revised draft came in at 168,000 words despite ending at a much earlier point than I had originally envisioned. When book two is finished, what I had initially planned for book one will certainly exceed 300,000 words.

The more I write, the easier it becomes. Writing two or three thousand words in a day is now common for me, although there are still days where I struggle to write anything. When that happens, I usually do something else or review what I have already written.

Creating the story

Audrey of Farmerton (Book One of Andoran’s Realm) was not plotted the way that most novels probably are. I came up with the basic idea of how to begin the novel, but I also needed to work toward events that had already occurred in adventures that involved Audrey. I took a few liberties, but I primarily worked within those constraints. This proved to be a challenge.

Farmerton itself barely existed when I began to write. It consisted only of Audrey, her parents, and the mayor. I gave Audrey a best friend and some additional relatives. The mayor gained a daughter who became a minor character. This helped to make Farmerton seem like more of a real place, but also complicated the return trips there later in the novel.

The biggest challenge by far was detailing how Audrey went from being an uninvited guest in Saxloc’s home to his adventuring companion and romantic interest. Here again, I was constrained by specific events that needed to occur. On the other hand, many of the people that Audrey ended up interacting with already existed, and it was simply necessary to work them into the story. And the Witch’s City was already well established including a map and numerous details. It was definitely a challenge, but it was an enjoyable one.

As I crafted the story, I found myself adding additional characters, some of whom developed their own story arcs within the novel. Many minor existing characters developed more detailed personalities, as well as mannerisms and quirks. Audrey herself changed, developing a drinking problem and anger issues.

The  story underwent major revisions following some critical feedback.That resulted in a much-improved novel that ended at a much earlier point. The material removed from the end will now be in Book Two of Andoran’s Realm.

About my novel

My first novel is titled “Audrey of Farmerton”. It is a fantasy novel, but it is unusual for several reasons. It is based on a Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) campaign that I have been running since  autumn of 1979. This provides me with an enormous amount of material to draw upon, but it also means that a number of other people have contributed by creating and developing characters, some of whom are depicted in the novel. In writing it, I have frequently sought input as to whether I have properly portrayed their characters. So in a sense, Audrey of Farmerton is a collaborative effort, even though I am listed as the sole author.

My novel doesn’t seem to fit any of the traditional fantasy genres. It is the story of how a peasant girl named Audrey makes her way to a large city and struggles to find a life for herself there, but it’s not really a coming of age story. There is some fighting and heroics, but it’s not really a heroic fantasy. There is no noble quest to save the world or massive struggle between warring kingdoms, so it’s not an epic fantasy. There is some romance, but that’s only a portion of the story, so it’s not a romantic fantasy. Audrey of Farmerton is probably best characterized as a slice-of-life story or even a soap opera. There’s a great deal of people simply interacting and going about their lives, but in a fantasy setting with magic and monsters.

I am planning to publish my novel through Amazon as a Kindle ebook and then see what happens. I primarily wrote it for the enjoyment of myself and my friends, especially those who have actually played in my D&D campaign. The second book, which tells more of Audrey’s story is already well underway.