From D&D Campaign to Fantasy Novel – Part 2

Dungeons & Dragons adventures (and many traditional fantasy novels) usually take place in lands that are modeled after medieval Europe. During that time period, there was no gender equality to speak of. With few exceptions, men were the the landowners, the business owners, the ones with authority. Some women were able to rise above this, and many wielded power behind the scenes, but it was really a man’s world.

In the early days of my D&D campaign, it was much the same. Most of the powerful non-player characters were male, including the villains. The group of adventurers was similar, dominated by males. But most of the players running those characters were male, so that wasn’t really surprising. As the years passed, things gradually began to change. I introduced a number of important female characters, both friendly and unfriendly. Players were also more willing to role-play characters of the opposite sex. That not only helped to even things, but it to make the adventures more lively.

In the first book of my Andoran’s Realm fantasy series, it is gender inequality that drives Audrey’s desire to leave her village of Farmerton. As a teenage girl, her future is set. She is expected to marry a man and bear him children. But she yearns to be more, to find a better life.

Audrey ends up in the Witch’s City, where there is much less gender inequality. The city is ruled by a woman. Women serve as city guards. Women run businesses and schools. Audrey soon discovers that the person in charge of the mansion she finds herself living in, isn’t the dragon-slaying husband, but his meddling wife. It’s not the perfect environment, but Audrey thrives there.

In medieval times, there was little in the way of practical birth control. But things are different in Andoran’s Realm. Anti-pregnancy powder, commonly referred to as AP powder, is cheap, readily available, and reliable. It is manufactured by alchemists, and if an unwanted pregnancy does occur, they can provide something to deal with that as well. Just like in our modern world, this empowers the women there. Audrey is certainly happy to learn about it.

Another surprise for Audrey is that prostitution is legal in the Witch’s City. One of her friends ends up taking employment as a courtesan, which I modeled after Japanese geisha, except that they also provide sexual services. (Authentic geisha do not.) Courtesans, some of whom are male, are both well-respected and well paid.

The second book of the series continues the trend, introducing even more strong female characters, including some rather odd ones. For me, it makes the storytelling more interesting and fun. And it’s also a challenge.

In Part 3, I will discuss racism in a world with multiple intelligent races.