How Not to Write a Book Description

Book descriptions are important, whether short ones in ad copy, or long ones on product pages. They need to hook the reader quickly, or they’ll just move on. Let’s start with a test. Which of the following is the best choice to start a book description?

  1. The new book from the Goldfish Today bestselling author of Koi Polloi.
  2. With nearly seventy-four 6-star reviews on GreatReads …
  3. “The best paranormal cooking book I’ve read this week.” — Ima Foodcritic
  4. Buy this book or I will slay you and all of your kin.

The first two come across as bragging. That will repulse some readers (including me). The third is citing a positive review of the book, but how does the reader know it’s legitimate? Or relevant? The fourth is a joke, but it probably would cause a reader to read more of the description. Here’s the bottom line: A book description should first and foremost describe the book. If it starts with anything else, then it is failing its purpose and probably hurting sales.

Am I an expert at writing book descriptions? No. I just rewrote the description of my first book and have no idea if it’s really an improvement.

Writing book descriptions is something that every writer struggles with and frets about. There are endless people offering advice or even offering to write them for you. And endless philosophies on how best to write them. There is no one right answer.

You didn’t ask, but here is my advice:

  • Describe what the book is about without spoiling the plot.
  • Keep it simple. No excessively-long sentences or obscure words.
  • Keep it friendly. Address the reader if that seems appropriate.
  • Use humor only if it’s appropriate.
  • Provide useful information, such as if the book is on Kindle Unlimited.
  • If you must brag or cite reviews, do it at the very end.

And there you have it. Now buy my books or I will slay you and all of your kin. 🙂

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *