Five Star Blog Post!

On sites that sell books (and other things), reviews are usually accompanied by a star rating, typically ranging from one (worst) to five (best). But if you start looking at the distribution of star ratings, it often looks odd. This, I think, is what led Netflix to announce that they are abandoning star ratings for simpler “thumbs up” or “thumbs down” feedback.

Star ratings tend to cluster at the two extremes for a variety of reasons. Some books are polarizing, resulting in readers who either love it or hate it. Reviews are more likely to be written by people with strong opinions that they want to share. The end result is an odd distribution of ratings, typically with relatively few lower than four stars. If you think about it, this makes sense. People rarely buy books blindly. They may be buying because they are already familiar with (and like) the author. Or it may have been recommended by a trusted friend. Or perhaps they read an excerpt first before committing to the purchase. In any event, most books are purchased with the expectation that the reader will enjoy them.

In an ideal world, the ratings would be objective and the reviews fair. Only great works of literature would receive five star ratings. In reality, star ratings represent people’s opinions and biases. Five stars means they really liked it, and probably not that it’s one of the best books ever written. One star might indicate a badly-written book, or it might simply indicate that the reader didn’t like the style of writing or hated the ending. Or maybe they’re just a troll. 🙂

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